Tag Archives: Marilyn Manson

That Good Kind of Metal Plagiarism

Note: There are a lot of links in this blog. Be adventurous and click away.

If you read this blog regularly, or only when you are truly bored, you know that I am a private headbanger and a public hermit.  You may not know, or believe, that I used to do comedy.  I’m not talking about watching it; I mean I used PERFORM stand up.  I used to get on a stage and make people laugh.  Here is proof – the link to my last show (Please note that my mother came up with the concept of the “sun roof”): Lisa’s last show, 2006, Fort Myers, FL.

I quit doing comedy because I am not a night person, and there were no morning comedy clubs.  I don’t think there are any now either, but if you know of one, let me know. Also, like most introverts, I don’t like hanging out with gobs of people, and it’s hard to do comedy without an audience. So, there’s that.  When I did do comedy, I wrote all of my own material.  I never ran out on stage, grabbed the mic, and said, “Here’s a little Carlin for you guys!!  A little Carlin, ladies and gentlemen.”  No.  That’s just wrong because that would be plagiarism.  You know, stealing someone else’s work.  As an English teacher, I teach students how to avoid that.  As a creative person, I get irritated with plagiarism in all forms.

For years, and years, like most of my life up until a few years ago, I HATED when musical groups would do cover songs. HATED it.  Seriously, I thought my eyes would roll out of my head when Fergie “covered” AKA ruined “Sweet Child of Mine” at the 2011 Super Bowl.  I could not believe that Slash didn’t reach right over and hit her.  Anyway, shortly after that my son played Seether’s version of Careless Whisper for me.  I LOVED it.  Hearing the metal version of Wham’s song, made me more open to other cover songs, especially the metal versions of formerly wimpy songs.  So, I now have a list of favorite cover songs, and here they are:

“Land of Confustion” by Disturbed   Sorry, Phil, this beats the pants off of your wimpy Ronald Reagan version.

“Careless Whisper” by Seether  While the original version will always remind me of that awkward dance with my 9th grade crush at Annie’s quince, I really like this amped up version better.

“Love Song” by Four Year Strong  This is SO much more energetic than the original.  I believe this singer when he says he is not going to write me a love song.  The original version puts me to sleep.

“Turn the Page” by Metallica  I love how the video highlights  a part of American culture that we just don’t like to talk about.  Plus, as a headbanger from the 80’s, I’m drawn to anything Metallica.  I once had a jukebox battle with someone in a bowling alley.  He kept playing country, and I paid extra to have my Metallica songs play first.

“Personal Jesus” by Marilyn Manson   I have read a couple of biographies about Marilyn, and I find him to be fascinating, and I’m not just saying that because I went to South Broward High School with Gidget Gein.

“People Are People” by A Perfect Circle   The really cool thing about this version of the song is that A Perfect Circle truly makes it their own.  Only the words are the same, really.

“Reach out and touch me!”

A mash-up of Marilyn Mason’s and Depeche Mode’s versions of “Personal Jesus” has been stuck in my head for a solid week, with “Reach out and touch me” repeating over, and over again in half British pop and half scream.  I’m guessing this is because I have been reading The Long Hard Road Out Of Hell, Marilyn Manson’s memoir.  The book was an honest and graphic look at the beginning of Manson’s career.  I like trashy memoirs as much as the next gal, but Manson’s descriptions were a bit much for me at times.  Some of them are trapped in my brain forever. Naturally, as soon as I finished the book, I wanted to read more about Brian Warner and his merry band of model/murderers.  So, I immediately downloaded Marilyn Manson Talking, which is an unauthorized book about Manson. 

I had been telling my son about The Long Hard Road Out of Hell as I read it, carefully editing out certain parts.  So, I told him I finished the book and immediately downloaded another one.  He replied, “Why? Do you even know three Marilyn Manson songs?”

HMMM. Good question.  The answer is that I have only heard two Marilyn Manson songs, and they are both covers.  One is, of course, “Personal Jesus,” and the other is “Sweet Dreams.”  I do know that the concepts for most of his albums come from his own nightmares.  Does that count? 

I know why I started reading the first book. Marilyn’s a hometown boy.  Sort of.  Brian Warner formed his band of Spooky Kids in Fort Lauderdale in the early 90’s.  In fact, I actually went to South Broward High School with Gidget Gein, the original Manson bassist.  Gidget went by Brad Stewart then.  I didn’t know Brad in school.  We ran in different circles, and I didn’t even know who he was until one of my friends told me to look in my year book.  I still think it is awesome that I went to high school with an almost rock star (Gidget was no longer with the band when they made it big) and the world’s first super model.  That’s right.  Janice Dickinson is also an SBHS alumnus, but I digress.

My son’s question got me thinking.  Why do I want to read MORE about Marilyn Manson?  I wasn’t sure exactly, and since I tend to over-analyze everything, I sat down and made a list of what interests me about Marilyn.

  1. He tells it like it is.  Marilyn Manson calls out good ole ‘Merica on all of its hypocrisy.  He doesn’t hold back, and he doesn’t care if people hate him for that.  And A LOT of people do hate him.
  2. He speaks openly about his creepy grandfather’s horrific porn collection even though his family would rather he keep his mouth shut.  I have many creepy childhood stories of my own, and I would love to write my own memoir.  Something always stops me though.  I’m afraid of angering my family and hurting my mother. I don’t have much in common with most of my family anyway, so I’m not sure why I worry so much.  If I ever do write a memoir it will be called Stories That Make People Twitch because that is what people other than my husband, son, or a trained mental health professional do when I speak of my childhood.
  3. His appearance has always intrigued me.  Why would anyone choose to look like this?  Then it dawned on me.  It’s a metaphor for our broken society.  It’s also a visual reminder that we are all broken, in some way.  All of us.  Most people have their soft spot, their Achilles heel, their Kryptonite, or whatever they want to call it.
  4. Most of all, like Madonna and many other musicians that I don’t actually listen to, I admire little Brian Warner from Ohio for following his dream.  He wanted to be a rock star, and he is.  He didn’t let anyone stop him.  I admire that drive, and I envy it. I used to think I would have my own talk show by now, or a lot more published novels.  Somewhere along the way, I got comfortable and I lost my drive.  Marilyn makes me want to find it again.

So, I guess that is why I want to learn more about the man behind the white contact lens and the drug-infested road stories.  I still don’t have a big desire to listen to his music, and I will never carve his name in to my chest like some of his crazy fans.  I will admire his tenacity from a far because he truly is his own Personal Jesus.

Public Apology:  After publishing this, I learned that the opening line is actually “Reach out and touch FAITH!”  It makes sense that the word faith would escape me with my geriatric hearing and all.  So, now I just have an incorrect version of the song running through my head.  Constantly.

 

"Reach out and touch me!"

A mash-up of Marilyn Mason’s and Depeche Mode’s versions of “Personal Jesus” has been stuck in my head for a solid week, with “Reach out and touch me” repeating over, and over again in half British pop and half scream.  I’m guessing this is because I have been reading The Long Hard Road Out Of Hell, Marilyn Manson’s memoir.  The book was an honest and graphic look at the beginning of Manson’s career.  I like trashy memoirs as much as the next gal, but Manson’s descriptions were a bit much for me at times.  Some of them are trapped in my brain forever. Naturally, as soon as I finished the book, I wanted to read more about Brian Warner and his merry band of model/murderers.  So, I immediately downloaded Marilyn Manson Talking, which is an unauthorized book about Manson. 

I had been telling my son about The Long Hard Road Out of Hell as I read it, carefully editing out certain parts.  So, I told him I finished the book and immediately downloaded another one.  He replied, “Why? Do you even know three Marilyn Manson songs?”

HMMM. Good question.  The answer is that I have only heard two Marilyn Manson songs, and they are both covers.  One is, of course, “Personal Jesus,” and the other is “Sweet Dreams.”  I do know that the concepts for most of his albums come from his own nightmares.  Does that count? 

I know why I started reading the first book. Marilyn’s a hometown boy.  Sort of.  Brian Warner formed his band of Spooky Kids in Fort Lauderdale in the early 90’s.  In fact, I actually went to South Broward High School with Gidget Gein, the original Manson bassist.  Gidget went by Brad Stewart then.  I didn’t know Brad in school.  We ran in different circles, and I didn’t even know who he was until one of my friends told me to look in my year book.  I still think it is awesome that I went to high school with an almost rock star (Gidget was no longer with the band when they made it big) and the world’s first super model.  That’s right.  Janice Dickinson is also an SBHS alumnus, but I digress.

My son’s question got me thinking.  Why do I want to read MORE about Marilyn Manson?  I wasn’t sure exactly, and since I tend to over-analyze everything, I sat down and made a list of what interests me about Marilyn.

  1. He tells it like it is.  Marilyn Manson calls out good ole ‘Merica on all of its hypocrisy.  He doesn’t hold back, and he doesn’t care if people hate him for that.  And A LOT of people do hate him.
  2. He speaks openly about his creepy grandfather’s horrific porn collection even though his family would rather he keep his mouth shut.  I have many creepy childhood stories of my own, and I would love to write my own memoir.  Something always stops me though.  I’m afraid of angering my family and hurting my mother. I don’t have much in common with most of my family anyway, so I’m not sure why I worry so much.  If I ever do write a memoir it will be called Stories That Make People Twitch because that is what people other than my husband, son, or a trained mental health professional do when I speak of my childhood.
  3. His appearance has always intrigued me.  Why would anyone choose to look like this?  Then it dawned on me.  It’s a metaphor for our broken society.  It’s also a visual reminder that we are all broken, in some way.  All of us.  Most people have their soft spot, their Achilles heel, their Kryptonite, or whatever they want to call it.
  4. Most of all, like Madonna and many other musicians that I don’t actually listen to, I admire little Brian Warner from Ohio for following his dream.  He wanted to be a rock star, and he is.  He didn’t let anyone stop him.  I admire that drive, and I envy it. I used to think I would have my own talk show by now, or a lot more published novels.  Somewhere along the way, I got comfortable and I lost my drive.  Marilyn makes me want to find it again.

So, I guess that is why I want to learn more about the man behind the white contact lens and the drug-infested road stories.  I still don’t have a big desire to listen to his music, and I will never carve his name in to my chest like some of his crazy fans.  I will admire his tenacity from a far because he truly is his own Personal Jesus.

Public Apology:  After publishing this, I learned that the opening line is actually “Reach out and touch FAITH!”  It makes sense that the word faith would escape me with my geriatric hearing and all.  So, now I just have an incorrect version of the song running through my head.  Constantly.